Moderna's Covid-19 Vaccine Is More Than 94% Effective, Preliminary Data Shows

Bulgaria Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Is 94.5 Percent Effective

Moderna released early results from a clinical trial with more than 30,000 participants, after United States pharmaceutical company Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech last week said their vaccine was 90% effective.

Moderna Inc. (NASDAQ:MRNA) announced its COVID-19 vaccine candidate is effective in preventing the disease 94.5% of the times.

The Moderna vaccine, which was co-developed by the US National Institutes of Health, is given in two doses 28 days apart, and the preliminary results are based on 95 volunteers of the 30,000 who fell ill with COVID-19.

Moderna expects to manufacture about 20 million doses of the vaccine this year.

Moderna's vaccine "enables a much more distributed model for us to get the vaccine out there, for example, in very rural areas and to be able to make that distribution process happen as conveniently as possible for those Americans that need vaccine", Hepburn said during a press call.

In an interview on BBC One's Andrew Marr Show, Prof Sahin said he expected further analysis to show the vaccine would reduce transmission between people and stop symptoms developing in someone who has had the vaccine.

Moderna is working with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Operation Warp Speed and McKesson (NYSE: MCK), a COVID-19 vaccine distributor contracted by the U.S. government, as well as global stakeholders to be prepared for distribution of mRNA-1273, in the event that it receives an EUA and similar global authorizations.


More than 54 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed around the world, with the death toll topping one million, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

Another bright spot: All 11 "severe cases" occurred in the placebo group and none in the mRNA-1273 vaccinated group.

Side effects included fatigue and muscle aches, but they were generally short-lived, the company said.

Crucially, Moderna also announced that its vaccine can remain stable at standard refrigerator temperatures of 2 degrees Celsius to 8 degrees Celsius for 30 days.

At lower temperatures of -20 degrees C (-4 degrees F), the Moderna vaccine remains stable for up to six months, the company reported.

The third phase of Moderna's trial on a coronavirus vaccine candidate involved some 30,000 participants, half of which took a placebo while the other half received the actual vaccine under development.

A Pfizer vaccine breakthrough a week ago came with a challenging cold chain component for storage and transportation.

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