Covid-19: Twins delivered in Birmingham while mother in coma

Perpetual Uke first fell ill with COVID-19 in late March. Her illness became so severe that she was taken to Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham where she later required a ventilator and was placed in an induced coma Sky News reported

She was admitted to hospital in Birmingham UK.

She was taken to Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, and was placed in a medically induced coma while on a ventilator, according to Sky News.

Doctors put her into a coma to save her life and she wound up giving birth to twins while unconscious.

Palmer, a girl, and Pascal, a boy, were born on 10 April at just 26 weeks old, weighing only 770g and 850g.

Sochika Palmer weighed just 770 grams while her brother, Osinachi Pascal, weighed 850 grams.

The children had to receive specialist neonatal intensive care at a unit.

UK's anxious husband Matthew responded to their prayers when they came out of a coma 16 days later and began their recovery path, he told Metro.

"I was really, really anxious and disoriented".


'It was really hard at first as during my sedation I had some really terrifying vivid dreams.

Dr Perpetual Uke, a rheumatology consultant at Birmingham City Hospital, said that, when she woke and saw her bump had gone, she believed she had tragically lost the babies.

A woman in the United Kingdom was pregnant when she contracted the coronavirus.

However, the story ended well, and the repatriated family is, in Uken's words, "very, very happy".

"They were telling me that you've had your babies and they were showing me pictures, these pictures didn't even look real to me. They couldn't see their mum for two weeks, which obviously made me very sad but, importantly, things had progressed well". I had dreams. I fainted, I could not see my pump, I thought my children were gone and my family were all dead.

The family were clapped out of the unit by an emotional team when they were finally able to leave the hospital.

'Their journey has been miraculous and the day of their discharge home under the care of our Neonatal Community Outreach Team (NCOT) was very emotional indeed.

'It was such a pleasure for us to care for this wonderful family and we have the upmost admiration for them'.

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