Judge blocks release of tell-all book by Donald Trump niece

Robert Trump and Donald Trump

A NY judge on Tuesday temporarily blocked the publication of Mary L. Trump's scathing book about President Donald Trump, her uncle, which describes him as the "world's most risky man", saying no copies can be distributed until he hears arguments in the case.

Her book is called "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man".

Her publisher has promised a "revelatory, authoritative portrait of Donald J Trump and the toxic family that made him" and "a nightmare of traumas, destructive relationships, and a tragic combination of neglect and abuse". "She explains how specific events and general family patterns created the damaged man who now occupies the Oval Office". President Trump's brother, Robert S. Trump, is leading the litigation on behalf of the Trump family. On May 25, Judge Peter Kelly of the Queens County Surrogate's Court in NY rejected Robert Trump's attempt to prevent the tell-all's publication, saying that his filings

Greenwald earlier Tuesday agreed to a preliminary injunction against niece Mary L. Trump and publisher Simon & Schuster.

Charles Harder, who represents Robert Trump, told ABC News his client was very pleased with Tuesday's ruling.

In court papers, Robert Trump maintained Mary Trump was part of a settlement almost two decades ago that included a confidentiality clause explicitly saying they would not "publish any account concerning the litigation or their relationship", unless they all agreed.


"We look forward to vigorously litigating this case and will seek the maximum remedies available by law for the enormous damages caused by Mary Trump's breach of contract and Simon & Schuster's intentional interference with that contract", Mr Harder said.

Mary Trump's attorney Theodore Boutrous Jr., in a statement, said she will appeal the decision.

He asked lawyers for Mary Trump, and the publisher Simon & Schuster, to appear in court on July 10. Both a representative for Simon & Schuster and an attorney for Mary Trump told ABC News they intend to appeal the ruling.

Adam Rothberg, a spokesperson for Simon & Schuster, also expressed disappointment in the court's decision.

Boutrous said the order was "a prior restraint on core political speech that flatly violates the First Amendment". They said the book violates a nondisclosure agreement that was part of the estate of Fred Trump, President Trump's father, after his death in 1999.

"I have a brother, Robert, very good guy, and he's - he's very angry about it", the president added. She and her brother Fred III said in court papers that someone in or connected to the Trump family got Fred Sr.to change his will and give them less than they expected.

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