Deliveroo TV ad becomes third most complained-about of the year

Deliveroo argued the advert was clearly not depicting a real life scenario as the mother disappeared into a 'magic bag'

During the distribution of the meals the woman calls out restaurant names and type of food: KFC, Wagamama, Pizza Express, Burger King, and others. Deliveroo said the advert was about emphasising "choice".

It also said Deliveroo should have made clear a separate delivery charge applies for each order.

While the ASA acknowledged that the TV ad did not depict a realistic household, Deliver chose the scenario to demonstrate one of the real-world benefits of its service - namely the wide variety of restaurants from which customers can order food.

The latest ban involves an advert showing a woman taking a delivery from a Deliveroo driver at her front door and then distributing meals from various restaurants around the house from a single bag.

The Deliveroo ad was also banned in September by ASA saying it was "misleading" its consumers which showed that the delivery was "unrestricted throughout the UK".


Viewers complained it modified into deceptive, declaring that Deliveroo potentialities needed to affect separate orders - with separate provide charges - if they wished food from different restaurants.

A Deliveroo spokeswoman said: "This advert underlined the huge choice of great restaurants available on Deliveroo".

A spokesman from the company said: "For the record, you can't actually dive into your Deliveroo bag, however hungry you are". Droga5's first work since it picked up the account, the ad has so far brought in a whopping 336 complaints from concerned viewers who felt it trivialized vehicle crashes. A Go Compare advert which featured the brand's recognisable male opera singer involved in a auto accident has had the most complaints (336) for trivialising vehicle crashes. It was only marginally beaten by a poster for the Cheltenham Fireworks show which featured a dog wearing ear defenders and angered animal-lovers for belittling the fear many dogs suffer from such displays.

The ASA upheld the complaints based on the codes around responsible advertising, and ruled that "f*ck was a word so likely to offend that it should not generally be used or alluded to in advertising", regardless of where it appears.

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