Bill Gates isn't sure Elizabeth Warren 'has an open mind'

Trump-critic Bill Gates isnt sure hed vote for Elizabeth Warren

Warren tweeted her response to Gates later the same day.

Invoice Gates mentioned Wednesday that he "made a mistake" when he determined to fulfill with convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein whereas in search of cash for his worldwide well being marketing campaign.

"I made a mistake in judgment in thinking those discussions would go to global health ... that money never appeared", Gates said during a panel discussion hosted by The New York Times Dealbook series.

Changes to the tax code require the approval of the U.S. Congress so "more rational minds" could prevail, Frank said.

Gates argued that the antitrust lawsuit Microsoft faced didn't make the tech environment more competitive.

Gates said he was "glad to pay a fair bit more in taxes" but said he did not plan to play a role in the election campaign through political donations. "Sorry, I'm just kidding", he added.

In clarifying his comments during the NY event, Gates said he is in favor of a higher estate tax and other ways of generating tax revenue, but said that a middle ground needed to be reached.

But just because Gates can write a 12-digit check for taxes doesn't mean he should, the tech founder said. "But when you say I should pay $100 billion, then I'm starting to do a little math over what I have left over".


"Would you want to?" the moderator asked. Elizabeth Warren's (D-MA) proposal that billionaires pay more in taxes to help cover the cost of her Medicare-for-All plan.

"That amount is in the ballpark of Gates" total estimated net workth.

"I'm not as phone-centric as they are", Gates said.

Gates, who is worth $106.8 billion in wealth, recently dropped to being the third richest person in the world behind Amazon's Jeff Bezos and luxury goods business magnate Bernard Arnault, according to Forbes' real-time billionaires rankings.

Gates also questioned whether Warren, who came to power after blasting big banks as a consumer advocate in the fight over bankruptcy reform, was "open-minded" - a characterization the Democratic presidential candidate soon disputed.

Tax reform has become a key talking point among contenders for the United States presidential election. Though he also says, "I don't have a life where I'm allowed to complain, because basically only 99 percent of things have worked out very, very well".

Signatories include investor George Soros and Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, who said they are non-partisan and do not recognize any candidates.

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