North Korean Crypto Attacks Investigated by the UN

UN Report South Korea Hardest Hit By North Korean Cyber Attacks

The new lengthier version of the report, seen by Associated Press, sets out that North Korea may have carried out at least 35 hacks in 17 countries and that the USA experts are investigating.

India came second in the list, incurring three attacks while Bangladesh and Chile followed suit with both nations having two cases each.

Thirteen countries suffered one attack - Costa Rica, Gambia, Guatemala, Kuwait, Liberia, Malaysia, Malta, Nigeria, Poland, Slovenia, South Africa, Tunisia and Vietnam, it said.

Cryptocurrency exchanges were repeatedly attacked, with at least four hits on South Korea's Bithumb. The intergovernmental organization is investigating 35 North Korea cyberattacks in 17 countries.

Due to its proximity, history, and number of crypto exchanges, South Korea was the country that suffered the most hacks, with at least 10 attacks recorded so far. Another known method is by crypto mining activities for funding professional military branches.


In one attack, the hackers managed to take over the ATM network for an entire nation and force 10,000 payments to alleged North Korean operatives.

The report stated that North Korea accessed bank infrastructure and employee computers to attack the SWIFT system, sending fraudulent messages and destroying evidence.

A new more detailed report made by the United Nations shows that the organization is now investigating 35 hacks in 17 countries which might have been ordered by North Korea.

Most recently, ZDNet reported that the US Department of Justice has formally charged a North Korean programmer for the WannaCry ransomware outbreak in addition to several other prominent cyber attacks.

According to a report from one unnamed country cited by the experts, stolen funds following one cryptocurrency attack in 2018 "were transferred through at least 5,000 separate transactions and further routed to multiple countries before eventual conversion" to currency that a government has declared legal money, "making it highly hard to track the funds". It identified one instance where malware was used to mine Monero and send the mined tokens to servers at Kim Il Sung University in Pyongyang.

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