Wireless Headphones Like AirPods Could Pose Cancer Risk

Here’s what 250 scientists says about your wireless AirPods

More than 250 scientists have signed a petition urging the United Nations and World Health Organization to develop stronger guidelines regarding the potential cancer risk and other health effects caused by non-ionizing electromagnetic fields, or EMFs.

Experts are warning Apple AirPods and similar technologies can send an electromagnetic field through the brain, 250 scientists have signed a petition to regulate this trendy technology in the best interest of consumer safety.

Last year, Apple sold more than 28 million pairs of AirPods and more than 16 million the year prior, according to the Daily Mail.

They use this to play music from a wearer's phone or tablet directly into their ears.

However, health experts warn that the small white wireless devices have a devastating impact on the wearers.

Airpods in particular have been singled out because of how they sit deeply enough the ear canal to expose some fragile parts of the ear to unsafe radiation.

He is among the large group of scientists to have signed a petition calling for "protection" from the technology.

"Numerous recent scientific publications have shown that EMF affects living organisms at levels well below most worldwide and national guidelines", states the petition, which also casts serious shade at the WHO. The document also brings up recent findings by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, suggesting that EMF "possibly" has "carcinogenic" effects on humans, since high levels EMF can increase heat and thereby boost cell growth in human bodies.

"Based upon peer-reviewed, published research, we have serious concerns regarding the ubiquitous and increasing exposure to EMF generated by electric and wireless devices".

It mentions cancer, neurological disorders, and DNA damage as among the possible harms some research has linked to EMF exposure.

"If you also use a cell phone on a daily basis, it's freaky to worry about the hazards of these earphones", Ken Foster, a bioengineering professor at University of Pennsylvania, told Health.com. He spoke: "There are many thousands of papers of varying quality and relevance to health that point in all sorts of directions".

Prof Foster added that cherry-picking data to prove a link to ill-health shows "these arguments have no credibility".

Advent of new wireless technologies are outpacing research and regulation, and its effects could have risky even disastrous health effects, such as the untested 5G posed to roll out using broader and far stronger signals than ever before. In addition, Wi-Fi has been said to present cancer risks.

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