Neti pot Seattle death: Doctors issue warning after brain infection ki

An MRI of the Seattle woman’s brain in February 2018 shows severe hemorrhaging. “It’s such an incredibly uncommon disease it was not on anyone’s radar that this initial nose sore would be related to her brain,” said Keenan Piper a researcher fro

Her doctor tells The Seattle Times there was "amoeba all over the place just eating brain cells". And that's where things went wrong, according to a recent report of the woman's case.

Swedish Medical Center didn't identify the patient who died just a month after being diagnosed. After experiencing an intense seizure and an apparent loss of brain cognition, doctors started to investigate the possibility of the problem being in her brain.

A variety of types of amoeba can cause deadly brain infections, which can also be contracted from getting fresh water in the nose while swimming. "I think she was using water that had been through a water filter and had been doing that for about a year previously", Dr. Cobb said. But the next day, they discovered that her brain was teeming with the amoeba. A specimen was sent to Johns Hopkins University for analysis.

The neurosurgeon, Dr. Charles Cobbs, operated on the 69-year-old woman last January.

The woman's condition quickly deteriorated.

A 69-year-old woman from Seattle, Washington, died after contracting a rare brain-eating amoeba from using a neti pot to clean out her sinuses, according to the Seattle Times. When the doctors looked at these samples of the tissue under the microscope, they could see the amoebas.

"There have been 34 reported infections in the U.S.in the 10 years from 2008 to 2017, despite millions of recreational water exposures each year", according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It appears that this woman became infected with the amoeba through flushing of her sinuses with the tap water.

In order to prevent any risk of infection, people should always read the instructions on a neti pot and only use saline or sterile water.

Such infections are very rare. Since 1993, the CDC says, there have been at least 70 cases in the United States.

In the case report, the doctors said there was evidence of amoeba infection from neti pots before, but that they did not test the water their patients had been using, and so they could not be sure.

Past year the U.S. Food and Drug Administration also issued a warning that improper use of Neti pots and other nasal irrigation systems could lead to risky infections, including one with a brain-eating amoeba.

Balamuthia mandrillaris: As Gizmodo reported, there have only ever been 200 reported cases of B. mandrillaris globally.

According to a report published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, doctors conducted a CT scan on the woman and noticed a legion in her brain.

Related:

Comments

Latest news

Tyler Perry pays off every layaway at two Walmart stores
Customers only have to one penny to pick up their items. "I know it's hard times. This is not the first time Perry has donated money for good causes.

Man coughs up startling blood clot shaped like a lung passage
A 40-year-old woman with asthma presented with a 2-day history of pleuritic pain of acute onset in the right side of the chest. And in the midst of one coughing fit he hawked up a bronchial tree - a series of tubes that distribute air to the lungs.

China to Implement Deals With US in Cars, Energy, Agriculture
China has said it will import more USA products to reduce its trade surplus, but no dollar amount has been publicly discussed. US President Donald Trump said today negotiations to defuse the high stakes trade conflict with China are "going very well".

Liverpool set Premier League defensive record in Burnley win
Gomez suffered a fracture to his lower, left leg in Liverpool's 3-1 victory at Turf Moor and will be sidelined for about six weeks.

United Nations rejects US-drafted resolution to condemn Hamas
But before the vote on the US draft resolution, Bolivian Ambassador Sacha Llorenty Soliz withdrew the amendment. The resolution ultimately picked up a plurality of 87 votes in support and 57 against - with 33 abstentions.

Other news