Naomi Osaka Reveals What Serena Williams Told Her After Winning US Open

Are there different standards for men and women in tennis? The USTA head says

The Serena Williams controversy has stirred resentment among tennis umpires ― and they are considering a boycott of her future matches, according to reports.

But lately - as shown by a recent spate of worldwide sporting squabbles, from Nike's Colin Kaepernick ad to the Serena Williams saga - this ideal of apolitical sport has slowly revealed itself to be a luxury of a select few, a privilege only afforded to those who have benefited from the rules set by society - and sport's - increasingly outdated institutions.

"She said that she was proud of me and that I should know that the crowd wasn't booing at me", Osaka said.

The potential stance comes after the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) and United States Tennis Association (USTA) supported the athlete following her claims of sexism against chair umpire Carlos Ramos in the final.

The incident began when Williams was penalized for allegedly receiving direction from her coach on the sidelines via hand signals, which is a violation of US Open rules. "Because I am a woman you are going to take this away from me?"

When the violation was announced Williams approached Ramos to insist she never takes coaching and would rather lose than "cheat to win".

Afterwards, Williams suggested that Ramos and other umpires are tolerant of worse criticism from male players.

But it seems as she had been preparing for the moment for a long time. Later in the same set, Ramos cited her for breaking her racket in frustration, and when she called him a "thief" for the resulting penalty that cost her a point, he issued a third violation that cost her a game.

She described Williams' behavior on court as "out of line". Calling him a "thief" reportedly earned her a full game penalty.

"They are always with their dogs behind, their team", she said.

The Czech star also gave her backing to Ramos while slating the WTA, who bizarrely came out in defence of Williams. "I'm here fighting for women's rights and for women's equality and for all kinds of stuff".

"I don't understand from where he's coming with that statement", said Djokovic, suggesting this was the first he has heard of umpires failing to treat men and women equally.

The International Tennis Federation, meanwhile, defended 47-year-old Ramos and said he acted "at all times with professionalism and integrity". "I think a lot of it maybe got over-amplified because it was the finals of the US Open".

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