UP: Russia to BLAST space rubbish with POWERFUL laser cannon

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   VAPORISING LASER Russian space agency Roscosmos is developing a cannon to shoot space junk

Engineers from an instrumental consortium that is part of the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos, are developing a technology to eliminate space debris, abundant in orbit, by means of a laser.

A three-meter optical telescope will have a "laser cannon" for testing, which can expanded to a larger laser if the research and development are successful, according to the report.

The proposal drafted by the scientists involves creating "an optic detection system which includes a solid-state laser and a transmit/receive adaptive optical system".

The company confirmed the existence of this document, but declined to elaborate any further.

The laser cannon will be based on a 3-metre optical telescope concept which is already being constructed to monitor space for satellites and potentially risky space junk.

A type of solid-base generator will supply power to the laser and it will heat objects by penetrating them with a beam until they gradually evaporate.

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     SPACE JUNK NASA believes there after over half a million piece of space junk orbiting Earth
GETTY SPACE JUNK NASA believes there after over half a million piece of space junk orbiting Earth

Earlier it was reported that there are at least 13,000 space debris objects orbiting Earth, according to the Russian space control system.

Space debris, more colloquially known as "space junk" is a considerable challenge as space exploration expands, and many nations have come up with ideas to solve the space junk issue in low-earth orbit.

As per NASA estimations, there are more than 500,000 traceable pieces of space junk "the size of a marble or larger", that are now travelling at speeds of up to 28,163 km per hour around Earth.

Space debris has become a growing concern in recent years, as collisions at orbital speeds can be highly detrimental to satellite operation and can also produce even more space debris in a process called Kessler's Syndrome.

In March, Australia's EOS Space Systems revealed it is also working on the photon pressure laser.

In 2017, Japan attempted to use a 700m tether designed by a fishing company to remove debris.

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