May to request emergency debate on UK's role in Syrian air strikes

Russian President Vladimir Putin backs the current regime in charge of Syria

British Prime Minister Theresa May, facing a rowdy session of parliament on Monday, defended her decision to join US -led missile strikes against Syria without first seeking parliament's authorisation.

The Parliament, coming back from its spring recess, is expected to hear Mrs.

"We have seen the individual stories, and they have been, some of them, bad to hear, and that is why I have acted", Rudd said. She accused Syria, aided by Russian Federation, of trying to block an investigation into the gas attack being done by the worldwide chemical weapons watchdog. "We have done it because we believe it was the right thing to do - and we are not alone".

Speaking before chairing talks among European Union foreign ministers in Luxembourg, she said that "people are suffering, people are dying, and I think the whole worldwide community has to take responsibility for this". Air and missile strikes were carried out on Syrian targets by British, French and American forces over the weekend without its consent.

But the prime minister may not find such backing when she faces parliament on Monday, where some lawmakers are angry that May took military action without their approval - a process that has increasingly become a tradition in Britain.

"These strikes are about deterring the barbaric use of chemical weapons in Syria and beyond", the UK PM said on Saturday, after the attacks took place.

"There is no proposal on the table at the moment for further attacks because so far, thank heavens, the Assad regime have not been so foolish as to launch another chemical weapons attack", he told the Andrew Marr show. He blamed the allies' airstrikes for hampering OPCW's efforts.

Ahmet Uzumcu, director-general of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, said Monday that the organization's team "has not yet deployed to Douma", two days after arriving in Syria.

May had joined the USA and France in Saturday's strikes in retaliation for a suspected gas attack.

On Monday, the UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson called the strikes, which targeted three chemical weapons sites, "calibrated and proportionate".

Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the main opposition Labour Party, called the airstrikes "legally questionable" and accused May of "following Donald Trump's lead".

Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP) Nicola Sturgeon said in reference to the strikes that Britain's foreign policy should be should be set by Parliament and not the United States president.

Leader of the Green Party, Caroline Lucas, pointed out the timing of the airstrikes was to avoid the need to hold a debate with the MPs.

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