Trump retweets Fox headlines about 'fallout' for Republicans who cross him

Armerding Laziness hypocrisy behind Republicans blunder on health care

So there you have it: Republicans have offered up four takes on repeal and replace and none of them increase the number of insured Americans or keep the same numbers as Obamacare.

Strikingly, while large majorities of Democrats and independents back efforts to sustain the statute, even Republicans and Trump supporters lean toward saying the administration should try making the law work, not take steps to hinder it. Besides a health-care bill, those include tax cuts and new infrastructure spending. Sixty percent of Americans said that Trump and Republicans, who control both chambers of Congress, are now responsible for problems with the law, compared to less than half of that - 28 percent - who say the blame for problems with the law lie with Obama and Democrats. Most Republicans (58%) and Trump supporters (59%) support these hardball negotiating tactics.

The level of rebellion that Trump faces if continues to sabotage Obamacare can be seen in a new poll that reveals 78% of Americans want Trump to make the Affordable Care Act work.

About 60 percent of people says that Trump and congressional Republicans are responsible for any problems with the health law. If Trump continues to mess with Obamacare, as this poll illustrates, Republicans will pay a heavy price in 2018.

This month's survey again finds more of the public holding a favorable view of the Affordable Care Act than an unfavorable one (52% vs. 39%).

When asked about the Senate's failure to pass a repeal-and-replace bill, most Americans (60%) say it is a "good thing", while about a third (35%) say it is a "bad thing".

And they want them to stop trying to scuttle it. Most prefer that they instead move to shore up the law's marketplaces, which are seeing rising premiums and in some areas few insurers willing to sell policies.

With the Kaiser survey consistently showing clear overall public support for retaining Obama's law, the numbers help explain why some centrist Republicans who rely on moderate voters' support opposed repeal or backed it only after winning some concessions.

"Americans are so sick of these career politicians and their line of work and that's why they elected Donald Trump", conservative author, commentator and former New York Lt. Gov. Betsy McCaughey told Fox Business.

Designed and analyzed by public opinion researchers at the Kaiser Family Foundation, the poll was conducted from August 1 - 6 among a nationally representative random digit dial telephone sample of 1,211 adults. For results based on subgroups, the margin of sampling error may be higher.

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